Top 10 New Species of 2008

26 05 2009

A new species of seahorse? A plant that kills itself (Amy Winehouse)? Naturally occurring decaf?

So now that they exist do they pay taxes?

So now that they exist do they pay taxes?

 

 

Yea these were all new species discovered in 2008. A top 10 list has just been released with a few decent entries. The total number of species discovered in 2008 hasn’t been tallied yet, but it’s anything like 2007’s 18,000+ new critters, bacteria, and fallen celebrities there are sure to be plenty to please. 

Below is the list accrued by the ASU institute (international committee of taxonomists)

1. Pygmy seahorse: Classified by its Latin name, Hippocampus satomiae, this species measures about half an inch long and was found near Derawan Island off Kalimantan, Indonesia.

2. A plant that kills itself: Found in a small area of northwestern Madagascar, a rare genus of palm — Tahina spectablilis — produces huge, spectacular flowers and then dies and collapses. Fewer than 100 have been found.

3. Decaf, please: Known as Coffea charrieriana, this plant found in Cameroon is the first record of a caffeine-free coffee species from Central Africa.

4. Spray-on species: An extremophile bacteria, Microbacterium hatanonis, was discovered in hairspray by Japanese scientists.

5. A stick that moves: The world’s longest insect, with a body length of 14 inches (22.3 inches including legs), Phobaeticus chani resembles a stick and was found in Borneo, Malaysia.

6. The Barbados Threadsnake: Leptotyphlops carlae measures only 4.1 inches long and is believed to be the world’s smallest snake.

7. A pale “ghost slug”: Selenochlamys ysbryda was a surprising find in the densely populated area of Cardiff, Wales.

8. A very limber snail: This unique species, Opisthostoma vermiculum, is found on a limestone hill in Malaysia and has a shell that twists around four axes.

9. Damsel in the deep blue sea: Chromis abyssus is a beautiful species of damselfish found in deep-reef habitat off the coast of Ngemelis Island, Palau.

10. Fossil mama: A fossilized fish, Materpiscis attenboroughi, is an extremely rare find from Western Australia and shows a mother giving birth 380 million years ago. (Via CNN.com)


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